Editorial

The Italian Review of Legal History is an online journal that aims to intensify the scientific debate around the history of law in Italy, Europe and the world. It shall be a tool for all colleagues and academics – whether Italian or foreign – to tackle the main issues in this field on an international level.
All articles will be preferably published both in their original language and in English, in order to foster dialogue among researchers from all over the world and help share their work on legal history.
The I.R.L.H. has adopted a code of conduct and a peer review system that are in line with the best practices currently in use. As such, the criteria in place require a relevant research focus that makes an original contribution to the science, as well as an innovative choice of subject matter that employs rigorous methodology.
The journal will cover a period ranging from the early Middle Ages to the present day. The evolution of law will be analyzed in all its forms, both from a general point of view and in specific detail. Focus will be placed on the intrinsic historicity of law, and on contextualizing it within public institutions, society, culture and the economy.
Continuity and discontinuity are hallmarks of legal history. The world is going through a phase of profound changes, and there has been a pursuit of new ways for law to deliver a more just society. In that light, a dialogue between positive law scholars and legal history scholars can provide the key to interpreting the present day, in addition to being a starting point for a reconstruction of rules and principles.
No less important is the continual dialogue with all academic disciplines that examine history: not only does this promote a divulgation of knowledge, it also helps develop a much-needed network of various specialized fields, which each have their own distinctive methodologies, languages and sources. In these modern times, fraught with challenges for all those who see universities and research as part of their civic engagement, the I.R.L.H. aims to be a forum for a diachronic analysis of legal and institutional dynamics.
The journal will be open to the exploration of all topics in the field of legal history, as suggested by the scientific committee or by Italian or foreign colleagues. The goal is to engage in an interdisciplinary exchange of ideas between jurists, legal positivists and historians of all areas of study through contributions from individual scholars, as well as through interviews with experts and an online forum.
Certain that this heartfelt tribute will catch him completely by surprise, we would like to dedicate the first two issues of the I.R.L.H. to our maestro, colleague and friend Antonio Padoa Schioppa.